LAKE ZIMAPAN INFO

MEXICO BASS FISHING

May Fishing Report

Lake Zimapan

Air Temperature: Min. 53°F         Max. 95°F

Surface Water Temperature: 70 72.5 ºF

Average number of fish per boat per day: 50-100

Average number of keepers per boat per day: 30-50

Biggest fish reported this to date:  11 lb 8 oz

Water clarity: crystal clear.

Best Lures

Plastics:

           5 Senkos:  Watermelon/red, watermelon seed.

           6 Zoom Shakey Head worms:  same colors as above.

           4 Drop Shot worms: same colors as above.

           4 Shad Shape worms: Watermelon seed.  

Crank Baits:

Heddon Pop'N Image Poppers: pearl white

Heddon Torpedo: frog

Lucky Craft Gunfish Pencil Popper: chartreuse

Bomber Fat Free Shad 8'-14': citruse, chartreuse shad, pearl shad

spro little john: old glory

The lake gets it 's common name from the town of Zimapán Hidalgo near by. The lake is 23 square kilometers in surface and in some places exceeds 600 ft in depth. It 's stocked with carp, tilapia, Florida bass and has a population of native cichilds and catfish that existed previously to the canyon and the Moctezuma river being damed.

 

 

The Zimapan Dam, also known as Fernando Hiriart Balderrama Dam, is an arch dam on the Moctezuma River about 15 km (9 mi) southwest of Zimapan in Hidalgo state, Mexico. The primary purpose of the dam is hydroelectric power production and it services a 292 MW power station with water.

The dam is a 666 ft tall and 400 ft long arch-type located in a narrow portion of the Moctezuma Canyon. The crest of the dam is 16 ft wide while the base has a width of 72 ft. The reservoir created by the dam has a capacity of 126,891 acre⋅ft and surface area of 9 sq miles. The reservoir is formed by the Tula and San Juan Rivers which join in the reservoir to form the Moctezuma River later downstream of the dam. Water from the reservoir is diverted through a 13 mi tunnel, bypassing 26 miles of the river downstream, before reaching the power station. Water at the power station powers two Pelton turbine-generators before being discharged back into the Moctezuma River. When both turbines are operating, the power station discharges a maximum of 2,084 cu ft. It operates as a peak power plant, operating 4 to 12 hours a day depending on energy demands

Contact Us

Call Tommy Crawford at 505-414-5464 (Central Time Zone)